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Health

Women bring about changes improving health in Bangladesh

Women have played a key role in bringing about changes in improving health in Bangladesh. Not only through the “massive and unprecedented deployment of diverse cadres of mostly female front-line health workers reaching every household” but in women who were empowered to take control of their own health and reproduction. “Pro-poor and pro-women” programmes, such as education and micro-finance, have reduced inequalities. Despite low spending on health, a weak health system and widespread poverty, the country has achieved great strides in life expectancy, vaccination rates, TB control and a child’s chances of surviving past the age of five, according to a series of focus papers published in The Lancet. <...

Disability and our social responsibilities

The International Day of People with Disability will be observed on December 03, 2013. The day is an international observance promoted by the United Nations since 1992. The observance of the Day aims to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights and well-being of persons with disabilities. The day takes place annually and focuses on a different issue each year. Person with disability are the part of our society. Over one billion people, or approximately 15 per cent of the world’s population, live with some form of disability. Persons with disabilities, “the world’s largest minority”, often face barriers to participation in all aspects of society. Barriers can take a variety of forms, including those...

Country makes exceptional health progress despite poverty

Bangladesh has had 40 years of exceptional progress in health, with infant mortality down, life expectancy up and good disease control, all despite being one of the world’s poorest countries, researchers said on Thursday. Most often in the news for its poverty or natural or manmade disasters, such as a factory fire that killed 1,129 people in April, Bangladesh was described in studies published on Thursday as a “remarkable success story” and one of the “great mysteries of global health”. “Over the past 40 years, Bangladesh has outperformed its Asian neighbours, convincingly defying the expert view that reducing poverty and increasing health resources are the key drivers of better population health,” said Professor Mushtaque Chowdhury from Dhaka’s BRACUniversity, who co-led a serie...

World Toilet Day: American Standard gives toilet systems to Bangladesh

American Standard has donated almost a half million life-improving SaTo sanitary toilet pans throughout Bangladesh. On the 12th annual World Toilet Day — and the first officially recognized by the United Nations — the company celebrates the toilet with a progress report on its Flush For Good campaign. The donations are expected to improve the lives of 2.5 million residents of Bangladesh during 2013 and 2014. Installations underway will be complete by the end of 2014. American Standard is executing the program with partners BRAC, WaterAid and Save the Children. Including a new initiative underway for Sub-Saharan Africa, American Standard expects to provide sanitation solutions for a total of 5.5 million people by 2017.

Malaysian experts to train doctors of Bangladesh hospital

Malaysia's expertise in the healthcare sector is being tapped by the Bangladeshi government via the newly launched Sheikh Fazilatunnessa Mujib Memorial KPJ Specialised Hospital and Nursing College. Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak said through the joint undertaking with KPJ Healthcare Bhd, the hospital would have a qualified and experienced team of hospital managers in place, comprising the chief executive officer, chief finance officer and chief nursing officer. "KPJ will also bring in specialists, nurses and other key personnel to serve at the hospital alongside local professionals. "The hospital will offer first-class healthcare, providing Bangladeshis with greater access to international standards of treatment. "It will support national efforts to provide a safety n...

Corporal punishment causes irreparable mental damage

Corporal punishment is a form of mental and physical torture that causes pain, humiliation, low self-esteem, deep psychological trauma, distress and irreparable mental damage, experts said. It may causes a multitude physical and social problems like school drop- outs, mood and anxiety disorders, alcohol and drug abuse, cardio- vascular disease, arthritis, obesity including irreparable mental damage," said Psychology expert Prof Dr MSI Mullick. A parent, whom the child is totally dependent on, when uses physical punishment, the child feels betrayed in the worst way possible. Regular physical punishment is responsible for lack of faith and may provoke rebellion, he added. Dr. Mullick also the Chairman, Department of Psychiatry of Bangabandhu SheikhMujibMedicalUniversity said, "Ch...